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Shenzhen Chen Yue Photography Training_Portrait Photography Tutorial__How to Learn Portrait Photography for Novices

2022-11-27 03:43:12 [Share Photography ] source:phoebeparke.com
Shenzhen Chen Yue Photography Training_Portrait Photography Tutorial__How to Learn Portrait Photography for Novices

Chen Yue Photography Classroom Portrait Photography Tutorial. Today, Teacher Chen Yue teaches everyone how to learn portrait photography, especially how a novice learns portrait photography well. First of all, we have to figure out what is the scene in portrait photography. Panorama refers to the fact that we can see the whole person from head to toe, but it can also refer to other objects: a panoramic view of a car will capture the entire car, and a shot containing only the doors and driver is more of a medium shot. One variation is the septate shot, which is shot from head to knee, which was originally intended to shoot the revolver hanging from his belt. A double shot is a shot in which two people are shot. The interaction of two characters in a scene is one of the most fundamental elements of a storytelling, so the double shot is one you will use a lot. The two figures in the picture do not have to be in symmetrical positions. They can be facing each other, or facing forward together, or facing away from the camera, etc., but the techniques you use to deal with this type of footage are the same no matter the situation. You may also occasionally hear a trio shot, a shot that takes in three people. The medium shot, like the long shot, is closely related to the subject. Obviously, it's closer than the panorama. The medium shot is a person sitting at a table in a restaurant, or someone buying a soda, shooting him from the waist up. Because it is closer to the main body of the performance, we can see the expressions of the characters, the details of the clothes, and so on. As a result, we are able to engage more personally with their dialogue and performance, rather than focusing on a particular character or detail. The close-up is the most important shot in the cinematic vocabulary, and it comes in several variants. The mid-range close-up is generally considered to be from the top of the head to the waist or some part of it. Close-up shots are generally shot from the top of the character's head to the height of the shirt pocket. If the shot is above the shirt pocket, it is generally called a head-and-shoulders shot. A close-up of the face is taken from the top of the head to the chin. Full shot is used less: parts of the forehead and chin are omitted, and only the eyes, nose and mouth are photographed. A close-up, maybe just the eyes, and a common case where an object-targeted item might be a ring, a watch, etc. on the table. Any shot that contains only one person is called a single shot.

(Responsible editor:Light)

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