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Incompleteness is not necessarily a pity, Korean artist Yee Sookyung uses broken ceramics to present the beauty of incompleteness

2022-10-01 03:06:40 [Dark ] source:phoebeparke.com
Incompleteness is not necessarily a pity, Korean artist Yee Sookyung uses broken ceramics to present the beauty of incompleteness

Living in a world created by oneself, this may be the ideal look, just like her, broken into magic. This artist not only restores those ceramics that are considered defective and damaged by potters, but also uses Kintsugi art for secondary creation: combining the works of art that are regarded as defective products, Contact, creating a heroic and fragile work. 01 Artists who take a different approach According to Korean tradition, artisans tend to destroy or discard imperfect ceramic workpieces. In the eyes of Korean artist Yeesookyung, however, this is a rare material. Since 2001, Yeesookyung has used these pieces of porcelain to create beautiful and imperfect sculptures. Yeesookyung (b. 1963) is an interdisciplinary artist living and working in Seoul, South Korea. Art has become an indispensable part of Yeesookyung since she was a child. She can open a window to communicate with the world through art, use art to understand the world, and turn art into her own tool to become the person she wants to be. . "I'm fascinated by all things ephemeral that break, break, fail, or disappear. The looseness created by these weaknesses creates new narratives by freely merging and connecting objects. But in general, I have no intention of Healing or repairing these objects. Instead, my work can be seen as a tribute to the Achilles heel of existence, including myself." Yee Sookyung gave his own understanding of his work in an interview. 02 Art that breaks the convention In our opinion, the purpose of repairing is usually to restore the broken artwork and cover the broken and incomplete parts with modern craftsmanship, while the artist Yeesookyung uses broken ceramics to create delicate shapes, And the use of gold to fill the cracks has formed a very personal form of artistic creation. Yeesookyung has made a name for herself with her unique collection of translated vases, starting with her collection of discarded porcelain fragments from Korean ceramic masters. She then uses these broken ceramics to create a unique contemporary sculpture, and finally restores the ceramics in gold, gluing the composite materials together. 03 Unswerving artistic heart When we take the high-speed train of time, every moment will change. Yeesookyung did not want to spend her artistic life in the past, growing up in the 1970s, educated in a racially homogenous environment and subjected to harsh cultural scrutiny under a military dictatorship. So, through her artistic career, she embraces fragmented identities, searches for missing cultural bonds, and bridges the boundaries between history and the present. She says "I use the traditional things I find as fragments to connect the missing links and expand my artistic vocabulary to appropriately express what I've been through in this unexpected and dangerous world. I'm often preserved Fascinated by the bizarre beauty of tradition, but also to depict the transcendence of artists who found a way to build on traditional forms." You can be bold in the pursuit of perfection, but nothing is perfect, Instead of chasing this unattainable goal, why not be with yee sookyung, accept imperfection, and turn broken into magic. Some pictures in this article come from the Internet. If there is any infringement, please contact the author to delete it. Editor丨Marco Typesetting丨marco

(Responsible editor:Share Photography)

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