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The leisurely and comfortable women described by Richard Miller are so beautiful

2022-12-08 08:04:18 [Photography art ] source:phoebeparke.com
The leisurely and comfortable women described by Richard Miller are so beautiful

Richard Emil Miller America, (1875-1943)—ArtYouhua—Richard Emil Miller (March 22, 1875 - January 23, 1943) was an American Impressionist painter and a member of the American Impressionist Colony of Giverny. Miller was primarily a figurative painter, known for his paintings of women posing languidly in indoor or outdoor settings. Miller grew up in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. His father, Richard Levi Miller, was a respected civil engineer in Pennsylvania specializing in bridges, and his mother was Esmerelda Story, a Missouri. Miller began to paint at an early age, initially as an assistant to the portrait painter George Eichbaum. He studied art at Washington University's St. Louis School of Fine Arts, beginning evening classes in 1891, before becoming a full-time student in 1892. It was the first art school in the United States to be affiliated with a university, and it relied on the methods of the French Academy of Fine Arts to teach. In 1898, he won a scholarship from the school to study in France, and entered the Paris Salon, which was quite successful in the early days. In 1905 he went to Giverny to live with his friend and fellow artist Frederic Carr, who happened to be Monet's neighbour. It was here that Monet greatly influenced Miller's later painting style. Miller married his student Wheeler in 1907 and had their first child in 1909. Miller spent fifteen years in France until returning to the United States in 1914. After returning to the United States, he settled briefly in Pasadena, California. In 1915 he taught at the California Institute of the Arts. From 1918 he settled in the Provincetown, Massachusetts Art Colony until his death in 1943 at the age of 68. Miller, a member of the National Academy of Design in New York and an award-winning painter of his era, was honored in both France and Italy, and received the French Legion of Honor. He has been the subject of a retrospective over the past few decades, and his work has been widely reproduced in exhibition catalogues and featured in several books on American Impressionism.

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