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Australian Physical Geography Photographers 2022: Appreciate the winning entries

2022-10-01 03:05:06 [the scenery ] source:phoebeparke.com
Australian Physical Geography Photographers 2022: Appreciate the winning entries

Contest Photo: 2022 Australian Geographical Nature Photographer | Photographer Ashley Jensen Overall Winner: Natural Predator. For several days, the boat watched the calf swimming slowly in the bay, getting weaker and slower every day, and more and more shark bites appeared on his body. Friends noticed oil stains on the surface, caused by the whale falling. I hurried over, jumped into the water, and found the skeleton of a young humpback whale lying motionless on the seafloor. Around the bare bones are several species of plump sharks. Coral Bay, Western Australia. Photo: Ashley Jensen. Contest Photo: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Jannico Kelk Animal Nature Contest Winner: Dinner. Every spring, something magical happens on the Great Dividing Range. After sunset, bioluminescent fireflies briefly appear in the darkest corners of the forest. However, they are far from completely safe. Leaving their lair, the insect-eating dark leaf-nosed bats display amazing acrobatic aerial combat by catching fireflies in flight. Queensland. Photo: Yaniko Kerke. Contest Photo: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Sandy Horn Urban Animals: Total Bliss. One of the two magpies I live in my apartment loves (really loves!) splashing water on a hot afternoon. Clare Valley, South Australia. Photo: Sandy Horn. Contest Photo: Australian GeoNature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Alan Kuo Our Impact Winner: Take the Hook. Kangaroos trying to jump over fences sometimes grab the barbed wire with their feet. As a result, the kangaroo's upper body fell to the ground and its feet were entangled in wire. In this condition, known as "pen hanging," the animal cannot stand up or go free, and unless a person can release it, it usually dies. Darlington Point, New South Wales. Photo: Alan Guo. Competition Photo: 2022 Australian Geo-Nature Photographer | Photographer Jarrod Koh nominated for 'Monochrome': Crack and Rumble. There was a thunderstorm in front of our house. I've never been this close to lightning. The thunder is like wavy galvanized steel. Here's a shot that captures the ferocity of the rainstorm and the energy released by lightning strikes. Middleton, South Australia. Photo: Jarrod Koch. Photo Contest: Australian GeoNature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Dan Jones Our Impact: Reuse and Recycle. Waste is not just waste, but a completely different resource; let's start using all our resources in a constructive way. Indian Hermit Crab (Coenobita) in Raja Ampat, Indonesia. Photo: Dan Jones. Contest Photo: Australian Geographic Nature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Callum Mackie Monochrome: Sky Ghosts. The black-shouldered kite is a small predator commonly found in rural areas. During the hunt, they hover in one place, flapping their wings quickly, and keep their eyes fixed on their prey. Moments after this photo was taken, the kite lowered itself into the tall grass for a bite to eat. Tula, Victoria. Photo: Callum McKee. Photo Contest: Australian Geo-Nature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Marty Smith The Guardian has announced the photos and names of the 2022 Australian Geo-Nature Photographer winners. The winning photo of the competition, organised by the South Australian Museum and the Australian Geographical Society, showed a humpback whale carcass and sharks circling around, artistically depicting the cycle of life where each creature feeds on food. The winner's photo published in the news headline was taken by photographer Matty Smith. In order to photograph the charismatic great white shark, he needed to find a shark that was not aggressive to avoid at least the risk of maiming. To attract the sharks, the photographer used a thin mixture of tuna oil and fish fillets. This photo was taken in the South Neptune Islands in South Australia. Competition photo: Australian GeoNature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Ellie Morris nominated the winner of Landscape: The Power of Nature. On a stormy day in early autumn in Western Australia, we saw dark clouds moving across the land in the wheat fields, raining along the way. When the wind picked up, a cloud of dust formed, along with rain and hail. Photo: Ellie Morris. Competition Photo: Australian Geographic Nature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Rosa Dunbar nominated for 'Junior': The Monarch's Caterpillar. Adult monarchs stand out for their characteristic orange and black spots, but their larvae are equally attractive with their striking yellow, black and white stripes. This photo was taken after rain, with raindrops covering the plants and their inhabitants. Taitap, New Zealand. Photo: Ross Dunbar. Contest Photo: Australian GeoNature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Joe Shemesh Landscape: The Lost World. The Lost World is located on the northeastern slopes of Mount Wellington in Tasmania. The area is 1,100 meters above sea level and consists of 180-million-year-old diabase formations. This photo was taken after a long time without rain. Photo: Joe Shemesh. Contest Photo: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Cian O'Hagan Junior Category Winner: Abstract Icons. My "icon annotation" image is an expressive image of a kangaroo climbing a rock on a friendly beach in Tasmania. I used a slow shutter speed to hide the shape and convey the power, grace and speed of this status symbol. Photo: Sian O'Hagan. Photo Contest: Australian Geographic Nature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Alex Pike Botany: Start Small. The ability of mangroves to survive in such harsh conditions never ceases to amaze. If this seedling survives the high salt concentration, daily tides, and scorching sun, it can grow as big as the one behind it. Port Kembla, New South Wales. Photo: Alex Pike. Competition Photo: Australian GeoNature Photographer 2022 | Photographer Alan Kuo Urban Animals: Swaying in the Wind. Lacewings are a group of insects that lay beautiful pearly white eggs on their gleaming stems. At home, they often put eggs on wooden door frames, but sometimes they put eggs in other places, such as old clothespins. The good news is that all these eggs hatched successfully! Bensville, NSW. Photo: Alan Guo. Competition Photo: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Jason Perry Astrophotography: Silence. Quiet. Taken on a foggy morning, before the Milky Way disappears into a dead blue hour. Torondo Reservoir, Victoria. Photo: Jason Perry. Photo Contest: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Justin Gilligan Botany Winner: Moss Cloud Forest. The plateau (868 m) of the Gower Mountains is home to an endangered ecological community known as the Moss Cloud Forest. This small forest is home to many endemic and endangered plants. It is bounded by dramatic slopes that descend through clouds into the sea below. Lord Howe Island, New South Wales. Photo: Justin Gilligan. Competition Photo: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Matt Testoni Animals in Nature: Midnight Seahorses. A seahorse hunts for prey in the frigid nocturnal waters off the coast of Kettering, Tasmania. They sit motionless in the seagrass, almost invisible to the untrained eye. It was amazing to see these little seahorses hunting crustaceans late at night. Photo: Matt Testoni. Competition photo: 2022 Australian GeoNature Photographer | Photographer Jack Wilton Endangered Species Winner: Ocean Giant. A critically endangered whale shark has swallowed a baitfish ball at Ningaloo Reef. Little is known about this shark because they are so rare that there are only a few records. Sharks are too slow, so you have to rely on the efforts of other predators like tuna to catch them. Coral Bay, Western Australia. Photo: Jack Wilton.

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